The New York Public Library Podcast
How did a former Harvard professor turned counterculture icon become an international fugitive? Authors Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis explain the larger-than-life story of Timothy Leary, the middle-aged acid enthusiast of the early 1970s, who famously preached "turn on, tune in, drop out." The PEN award-winning writers of Dallas 1963, talked with Aidan Flax-Clark about their research at NYPL and remarkable true story at the heart of their newest book, The Most Dangerous Man in America: Timothy Leary, Richard Nixon & the Hunt for the Fugitive King of LSD.

 

Direct download: 2018.01.23_Leary_NYPLPod_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:28pm EST

The James Beard Award–winning food historian and cookbook writer was at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture this past fall to talk about her memoir, My Soul Looks Back, with chef and co-host of ABC's The Chew, Carla Hall.

Direct download: 2018.01.16.18_Harris_NYPL_Podcast_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The best-selling journalist speaks with Danish reporter on the Arctic, Martin Breum, about melting ice and global solutions for our changing climate.

Direct download: Naomi_Klein__Martin_Breum.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The journalist and 2017 National Book Award Winner delivered the Library's annual Robert B. Silvers Lecture. The talk is named in honor of the co-founding editor of the New York Review of Books, who died in March 2017. With unexpected candor and intimacy, Gessen traced her own life as a sequence of choices and explored how notions of choice affect ideas about immigration, identity, and purpose.

Direct download: Masha_GessenThe_Stories_of_a_Life.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Neil Gaiman's reading from 2013 uses a rare prompt copy that belonged to Charles Dickens himself and now resides in The New York Public Library. Dickens marked it up and annotated it for the express purpose of performing the story in front of an audience, which he did regularly in the 1850s and 1860s.

Direct download: Neil_Gaiman_reads_A_Christmas_Carol.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Is self-interest the only force motivating business? Or can altruism be an equally powerful driver? It's a question that Muhammad Yunus, the Nobel Prize–winning father of microcredit, answers in his latest book, A World of Three Zeros: The New Economics of Zero Poverty, Zero Unemployment, and Zero Net Carbon Emissions. He spoke with fellow economist Jeffrey Sachs.

Direct download: Muhammad_Yunus__Jeffrey_Sachs.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The titan of American poetry was at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in November to talk about her latest collection, A Good Cry. She spoke with Joy-Ann Reid, the host of MSNBC's AM Joy. 

Direct download: Nikki_Giovanni_Joy-Ann_Reid.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The Pulitzer Prize–winning literary historian and Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright discuss Greenblatt's latest book, The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve, "a life history of one of the most extraordinary stories ever told." Exploring the power of narrative to travel from myth into reality, Greenblatt and Kushner traced the tale from its biblical origins through its imaginings in the minds of writers and artists from St. Augustine to Albrecht Dürer to John Milton. 

Direct download: Stephen_Greenblatt__Tony_Kushner__Adam_and_Eve_in_the_Teeth_of_Time.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the Poetry Editor of The New Yorker speaks with Garnette Cadogan about his most recent work of nonfiction, Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News. Young traces the particularly American tradition of cons, hoaxes, and fakes, from P. T. Barnum to today.

Direct download: Kevin_Young__BunkHoaxes_Hooey_Hocum_Cons_Plagiarists_and_Forgers.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The Soviet famine of the early 1930s killed around 5 million people; almost 4 million of them were Ukrainians. As Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and Washington Post columnist Anne Applebaum demonstrates in her latest book, Red Famine, it wasn't fate or chance that skewed those numbers so heavily—it was something much more deliberate, and much more sinister. And the story behind it was, until recently, in danger of disappearing. Applebaum spoke about recovering it at the New York Public Library with John Podhoretz, the editor of Commentary magazine.

Direct download: Anne_Applebaum__Fighting_Against_the_Great_Forgetting.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST